LONDON - Support for the Brexit Party has plummeted in the past few days, as leader Nigel Farage has been accused of "bringing about his own worst fears".

Voters appear to be have turned away from the party in their droves since the December 12 general election was announced and Mr Farage revealed he will not stand as an MP.

The latest polling from YouGov shows the Brexit Party's share of the vote has been cut in half. On Thursday, October 30, it had 13%, but this fell to just 7% on Saturday, November 1.

Back in June, riding high from its success in the European elections the previous month, the Brexit Party was the most popular in the UK, according to YouGov, with a 26% share.

The latest figures show the Conservatives on 39%, Labour on 27%, the Lib Dems on 6% and the Greens on 4%.

Mr Farage still insists he can be the kingmaker in the general election, even if he has decided against running himself, as he prepares to reveal his party's candidate list on Monday.

The former Ukip leader has already failed to become an MP on seven separate occasions in a series of elections and by-elections, and has been ridiculed in Europe for his decision to stand asideon this occasion.

Conservatives are angry at Mr Farage's intention to run Brexit Party candidates in more than 600 seats unless prime minister Boris Johnson drops his EU deal.

Mr Farage, said he could "serve the cause better traversing the length" of the country than himself running – and potentially failing – as an MP for an eighth time.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr Show: "I've thought very hard about this – how do I serve the cause of Brexit best, because that's what I'm doing this for.

"I don't want to be in politics for the rest of my life."

Steve Baker, the chair of the European Research Group band of hardline Tory Brexiteers, warned that Mr Farage is risking creating a hung Parliament by "dogmatically pursuing purity".

Mr Baker told The Telegraph: "That's the irony of Nigel Farage. He risks being the man who hands Boris a weak and indecisive Parliament, and bringing about, therefore, his own worst fears."

On the opposite side of the Brexit spectrum, the Lib Dems were not ruling out forming a Remain electoral alliance in up to 60 seats to boost the chances of preventing a Conservative majority.

Talks are underway between the Lib Dems, Plaid Cymru and the Greens to boost the chances of electing anti-Brexit MPs.

Lib Dem leader Jo Swinson told Sky News: "I wouldn't necessarily assume that the numbers are accurate.

"I think it's fair to say that in the vast majority of constituencies the party of Remain that is going to be best-placed to win that seat will be the Liberal Democrats."